New transitional housing for people leaving residential addiction recovery programs is now available in Steamboat Springs.

New transitional housing for people leaving residential addiction recovery programs is now available in Steamboat Springs.

The Foundry Treatment Center opens transitional sober housing

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— People in recovery from drug and alcohol addiction can now take advantage of new transitional sober housing provided by The Foundry Treatment Center.

The center last week officially opened two transitional living houses in Steamboat Springs, one for men and one for women, each with six beds.

The housing is meant for people continuing their recovery after completing a residential program at The Foundry or elsewhere.

Earning accredidation

The Foundry Treatment Center is now accredited by The Joint Commission for services being rendered at all five levels of care the center offers, including medically assisted detox, intensive residential treatment, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatient.

According to The Foundry Chief Operations Officer Austin Eubanks, the Joint Commission is internationally known as the gold standard for health care organizations, with requirements more stringent than those to earn state licensure. About 25 percent of addiction treatment programs in the nation have Joint Commission accreditation.

“We can be collaborative with other treatment centers in that regard,” said The Foundry’s Chief Operations Officer Austin Eubanks.

The 12-week transitional housing program is intended to help participants return to sober living after completing a residential program.

“People come out of treatment with all these skills and with no idea how to apply them,” Eubanks said.

People in the transitional housing program engage in 11 hours of weekly therapy, including nine hours of group therapy and two individual sessions, all held in the evening to allow participants to begin working or going to school.

They are given a $100 per week grocery stipend and live within walking distance of a bus stop.

Participants are subject to urine tests in the morning and evening, and each is outfitted with a Soberlink alcohol monitoring breathalyzer.

Foundry staff members can ask clients to submit to a random breathalyzer test wherever they are. The device can also snap a photo of the person and report his or her GPS coordinates.

“The level of accountability, as far as sobriety is concerned, is unparalleled,” Eubanks said. “We keep a close eye.”

Residents also spend six hours per week with an individual case manager, usually someone else farther along in long-term recovery.

The case manager can help a person find a sponsor, work on a resume or fitness regimen or build other life skills.

Overall, The Foundry now offers 30 beds as part of three levels of care, including detox, residential and transitional housing.

Moving forward, the organization plans to open a long-term, cost-effective sober living housing facility, which would involve less therapy and support for residents, but provide a place for a group of sober peers to live near each other and hold each other accountable.

To reach Teresa Ristow, call 970-871-4206, email tristow@SteamboatToday.com or follow her on Twitter @TeresaRistow

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